The Edge in New Haven is eclectic and fun

0
1195
Owner of The Edge, Kathleen Brown, invites women to come in for primitive home décor items and get their hair styled, have their eyebrows trimmed, waxed and tinted and enjoy a massage. (Rod King)

By ROD KING
For IN|FW Newspapers

NEW HAVEN — The Edge is the kind of place where women can spend all day. So says Kathleen Brown, owner of the new home-goods shop at 619 Broadway.

Inside is an eclectic collection of primitive home décor items ranging from old buckets and picture frames to unique vases and statuary artfully displayed nearly to the ceiling. In addition, many one-of-a-kind homemade objects produced there in the store are also on display. The 30-foot-long south wall is lined with drawers full of parts for do-it-yourselfers to make their own bracelets, necklaces and distinctive jewelry.

Then there’s the work table and behind that is a two-chair hair salon operated by Brown and her daughter, Alena Jalae. Both are trained, certified stylists.

Another few steps deeper into the store is the Brow Bar run by her daughter where customers can get their eyebrows trimmed, waxed, tinted, shaped and tweezed. She also gives classes on doing eyebrows and makeup.

Last stop on the tour of the 1,800-square-foot building is the massage room. This is where Brown, a certified masseuse, helps customers relieve tired muscles, and relaxes damaged tissue, frazzled nerves and built-up tension.

Ribbon-cutting to officially welcome The Edge to New Haven was held June 20. From left to right, are Craig Dellenger, Mayor Terry McDonald, owner Kathleen Brown, Brett Brown, daughter Alena Jalae and Chamber of Commerce President/CEO Charlie Hatten. (Rod King)

As Brown says, “this is not really a business, but a passion for all the things I love. Our grand opening was held June 1 and I was happy to have an official ribbon-cutting June 20 followed by a Meet Me @ 5 sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce. Everyone has been very helpful in getting us started and it’s really appreciated,” she added.

“My husband, Brett, and I have been getting the building in shape since January 1. I did the design, scraping and painting and he did the heavy stuff. He made a couple of huge floor-to-ceiling mirrors for the salon and a couple accent pieces that look like bridge girders out of Styrofoam. Along the way I learned that this was once an auto repair shop, a salon, a quilt shop and a telephone communications store.

“Most everything on display was accumulated after I took a four-year break from hairstyling and doing massage therapy. I started buying things at estate sales and auctions and pretty soon had our house and garage overflowing. A friend and I began holding barn sales once a month in Monroeville. Stuff was selling so fast I decided it was time to have a real store. And this is it.”

A wall of jewelry parts invites customers to design and build their own jewelry. (Rod King)

Her huge jewelry parts inventory, which is comprised of high quality American-made brass parts plated with gold or silver, was purchased from a woman retiring from the business. The storage drawers were part of the deal. “People from 6 up are welcome to stop in and make their own jewelry for just $10 or $20 and walk out with a one-of-a-kind piece. We’re here to help them with their design and the construction, too,” she said.

After graduating from South Side High School in Fort Wayne, Brown attended cosmetology school and became a hair stylist. While having a massage years later, her interest turned to massage therapy. She took the training and ended up operating shops in Waynedale, Georgetown and Jefferson Pointe. In between, she and her husband flipped houses and have 40 rental homes in New Haven.

Store hours are Monday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Information on The Edge can be found at theedgenewhaven.com, Facebook at The Edge Home Goods or call (260) 557-3055. “People who like The Edge on Facebook get a 10% discount,” Brown added.

The eclectic collection of primitive home goods ranges from old buckets and picture frames to unique vases, statuary and bird houses. (Rod King)